The Art of Moodboards

Moodboards are a great way to collect resources and images that can inspire your design projects. There’s many types of moodboards; physical printed images, digital collections or through apps like Pinterest and Milanote. It’s safe to say as architecture students moodboards will be one of the more enjoyable aspects of the course.

In this article we’re going to show you the best practices of putting together a moodboard and how you can take it a step further by just putting in a little more effort. Even finding one amazing reference can change the nature of your project and help you understand a bit more about what you want to design, your preferred style of architecture or could be useful as a future reference.

‘Good artists copy, great artists steal’

What does that quote mean exactly? Essentially, anyone can copy a set of plans, elevations and diagrams and pass it off as their own. Ideas too can be completely copied exactly but that doesn’t mean that the person copying is a good artist – or in this case architect. The benefit of studying architecture is all about going through the design process, figuring out what works and doesn’t and coming up with solutions to problems. In this context, ‘stealing’ means analysing someone else’s work and interpreting multiple ideas and concepts and creating something new from it. Inspiration is never a bad thing.

The image above is an example of a ‘murder board’ style I created for my second year project. It’s a mix of images, diagrams and text that are all interconnected in some way. This can be a good way of viewing all the initial ideas in one place. The benefit of a moodboard is that if you ever feel like your mind goes blank or you run out of ideas, you can always look back to your moodboard or collection of images to spark any new thoughts.

Pinterest

Pinterest

Pinterest is the place for creating such boards. I make one for each of my projects and honestly, once I start pinning, I don’t stop! The beauty of the way Pinterest works is that once you pin something, it shows you similar images straight after as well as on your home-feed. That way, once you pin one thing, you get 10 similar ones after it. I suggest using Pinterest as simply as possible – there’s no need to faff around with sections because you’d want to keep it pretty general.

Think about the stages of your project aswell. As it comes to the end of the year, you might want to think about creating a board of reference images for final illustrations and renders. This way it’s separate from general architecture projects and gives you a streamlined view of styles and colour palettes you might think of using.

Pinterest is free, has no limits and can be used on desktop and the mobile app.

Other Methods for Moodboards

There are many ways of creating moodboards, in fact, it doesn’t even need to be a collection of images. Literature, music and media can inspire the best of us. As part of your portfolio, you could also create a collage of the inspirations which can help you work out aspects of the design or understand how two ideas can merge together.

A collection of images stored on your computer or external hard-drive could also be another option if you wanted to curate the collection to be minimal. In fact, if you do enough research on specific projects, they can be used later on as case studies where you can show the example of a design aspect and explain that you’d like to re-create it or adjust it to suit your brief. For technical research, references could also be a great way to find specific details or newer materials that you may want to use in your building.

There are multiple tools online to help you create moodboards, mind-maps and collections of references that you can use for your projects. Check out this article on How to Make a Moodboard. Creating a moodboard should be pretty high up on your list when you start a new project, don’t wait for yout tutors to tell you to create one or start looking for projects that inspire you. Take the initiative and create one yourself.

Back in my 2nd year, we were prompted to keep a Tumblr blog of our progress – nothing formal but it was a way of recording our progress and keeping in touch with our tutors outside of tutorials. You could also think about doing the same thing. A moodboard doesn’t need to be constricted to anything specific and the idea is for you to use it along the various stages of your design.

Let us know how you use moodboards and collages and your preferred method of keeping a record!

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